A court in Navarra has found five men from Seville known as "the wolf pack" guilty of "continued sexual abuse" of an 18-year old woman at the San Fermines bull running festival in Pamplona in 2016, but cleared them of rape, the court announced on Thursday afternoon.

The judges—two men and one woman—ruled two-to-one in favour of the nine-year prison sentences handed out to each of the accused, with a third writing a dissenting opinion calling for a not-guilty decision.

Prosecutors had sought longer than 20-year sentences for rape for the five.

The court found the five, having met their victim in the early hours of July 7, 2016, walked with her and, after she kissed one of them, led her in to the entrance hall of a residential block, despite her having "felt uncomfortable" and suggesting walking down another street.

Once inside, part of the entrance hall was "a space without an exit"—measuring just 2.73 metres by 1.63 metres at its widest part. In that space, the victim was "penetrated in the mouth" by all five men, in the vagina by two, one of whom repeated the crime, and anally by another.

"None of them used a condom."

Two of the men recorded their crimes on mobile phones, and one of them stole her mobile phone before they all left the building.

Describing one of the videos the men recorded of their crimes, the judges said there were "no signs, gestures or attitudes" that suggested the victim was enjoying or comfortable with the situation.

"This video well illustrates in our consideration the clear reality of the situation, shows in a clear manner that the victim is subject to the will of the [five] accused, who use her as a mere object, to satisfy on her their sexual instincts."

Judges describe the victim, in another video, as "crouching down", "shouting" and "moaning in pain", "terrified" and "boxed in", "subject to the will" of her attackers.

After the attack, the victim then dressed herself, realised her mobile phone was missing, went out on to the street, "increasingly worried and uneasy, and began to cry".

She was found on a bench, "crying inconsolably", by a couple, who called the police. She was taken to hospital for treatment and given "an emergency contraceptive".

The five men were arrested later that morning. The victim suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and is still undergoing psychological treatment, the judges said.

The main points of the judgement, even before commentators had time to digest the full 371-page document, created an immediate political and social outcry. Women on social media announced protests in more than 40 Spanish towns and cities for Thursday evening.

Socialist Party (PSOE) leader Pedro Sánchez said on Twitter that "She said NO. We believe you and we still believe you. If what the wolf pack did was not group violence against a defenceless woman, what then do we understand by rape?".

Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias told a TV programme the judgement was "inadmissible".

"It is saying to the women of this country that if they do not risk their lives standing up to five thugs who are twice as big as them, what they are going to do to them is not rape."

Ciudadanos leader Albert Rivera said he respected the decision but "as a citizen and as a father it is hard for me to accept the wolf pack judgement".

The articles of the Spanish Criminal Code dealing with sexual abuse, sexual assault and rape make a distinction between the different crimes based on the presence, or not, of "violence or intimidation" during the events.

The judges ruled there had been no violence or intimidation used, according to the legal definitions of those terms, and therefore no crime of rape.

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