• The Catalan government said Catalan police might disobey judges. "I think the police, all of them, have priorities in life; removing a ballot box is not investigating crime", said the First Minister, Carles Puigdemont. (TSR)

  • Public Prosecutor ordered Catalan police to obey judges. Catalan police chief Josep Lluis Trapero was told in person that he must act to stop the referendum from occurring, and that he must obey judges' orders. (TSR)

  • Madrid judge banned Catalan referendum event. He ruled City Hall had a duty to uphold the law and said the event was "in no way" in the general interest, and clearly in support of an unconstitutional, suspended act. (TSR)

  • Constitutional Court formally suspended the secession bill. As it always does with central government challenges to Catalan separatists laws and declarations. It issued another long list of people who are to be informed personally of the need to obey the law, including, again, the entire Catalan government and the Speaker of the Catalan parliament.

  • Basque nationalists warned Rajoy not to go too far in Catalonia. PNV spokesman Aitor Esteban said that "responding to the issue of Catalonia by going beyond certain limits and levels would complicate the relationship we might have with the PP". He did not specify further what "certain limits" means. Rajoy depends on the PNV for his budget in Congress.

  • Court did not ban Catalan TV3 from reporting on referendum. There was confusion over the use of the word "informar" in a court order, and Catalan public television took it to mean Spain's Constitutional Court was restricting their right to tell viewers what was going on with the vote. Not true, the High Court in Catalonia told The Spain Report: "They're talking about "informar" in a judicial sense, not in the sense of reporting the news".

  • Mariano Rajoy said extremist radicals are in charge in Catalonia. "You have divided Catalan society", said the Prime Minister in the Senate: "and threatened newspapers and mayors".

  • PSOE leader Pedro Sánchez tried to define "nation" again. It didn't go much better than last time. Speaking this morning in Barcelona, Mr. Sánchez said: "we have a non-nationalist vision of the term 'nation'". To add to the "nation of nations" or "all nations are Spain" of previous attempts.

  • Tennis star Rafa Nadal compared Catalonia to a traffic light. He said he was worried and saddened by the turn of events: "I can't drive through a red light because I don't think that traffic light is correct. And the people who are trying in Catalonia have to understand that".

  • Podemos wants to have Catalan cake and eat it. Spokeswoman Irene Montero said there was no judicial solution to the problem in Catalonia and that the Catalan police, the Mossos, must obey both the Catalan government and the Constitutional Court. "They must comply with both at the same time", she said: "both at the same time".

  • Spanish Congress to debate Catalan situation next Tuesday. Ciudadanos has tabled a motion to express support for the government position on the Catalan crisis. "We want each party to make their position clear", said spokesman Juan Carlos Girauta.