• Catalan government broadcasts first referendum ad. The 10-second spot (above), which makes no explicit reference to the vote, and mentions no date, shows some empty train tracks arriving at a junction: "You were born with the ability to decide: will you give that up?".

  • Chief prosecutor said his office is ready for Catalan challenge. Speaking before King Felipe at the opening of the judicial year, the Director of Public Prosecutions, José Manual Maza, promised a "firm and energetic" response to separatists: "there is no room for any kind of hesitation".

  • Chief justice said civil servants should not hesitate to defend law. Speaking at the same event, Carlos Lesmes also alluded to the Catalan question: "no one will suffer for complying with the law". Any attempt to secede from Spain, he added, would be "unacceptable".

  • Catalan parliament set to pass independence laws. Regional opposition parties tried to delay the passage of the referendum and secession bills through the regional chamber, which is expected to take place tomorrow following an alteration of the order of the day. They failed.

  • Catalan government says referendums not illegal. Spokesman Jordi Turull said that part of the Spanish criminal code had disappeared in 2005. The prosecutor's office said before the summer that buying ballot boxes would be a misuse of public funds and using police to secede would be sedition.

  • Ciudadanos pushes for intervention on Catalan separatism. Albert Rivera met Mariano Rajoy at the PM's office this morning and said: "I hope the government doesn't allow the vote this time, like it did on November 9 [2014]". He added Catalan First Minister Puigdemont is "fixated" on independence.

  • Ciudadanos leader denounced Facebook hate speech. One woman wished the party's leader in Catalonia, Inés Arrimadas, be "gang raped": "such a disgusting bitch doesn't deserve anything else". Arrimadas said she would make a formal complaint. The woman later closed her Facebook page.

  • Rajoy met Speaker of deposed Venezuelan parliament in Madrid. The Prime Minister's office said Spain was "fully committed to democracy", and wants a negotiated solution and the release of all political prisoners. Lilian Tintori was due to attend but has been prohibited from leaving the country.

  • Pedro Sánchez got stuck on "Spain" again. The Socialist Party leader doubted and dodged and then said he believed there were "at least three" nations in Spain: the Basque Country, Catalonia and Galicia. (TSR)

  • Tourist spending reached new high in July. The National Statistics Institute said a 16.3% increase had been recorded compared to the same month in 2016. Every month of 2017 has seen increases. The average spend per tourist in July was €1,139. Scandinavians, Germans and Brits spend the most.